Chocolate Marble Cookies

Chocolate Marble Cookies

Today I pulled out an old cookbook that I purchased many years ago but hadn’t looked at for ages. As I browsed through the pictures and recipes, I was surprised by how many of the recipes I had actually tried. I believe that it is also the first recipe book where I made notes for nearly every recipe I tried.

Chocolate Marble Cookies

Adding melted chocolate to the batter

Chocolate Marble Cookies

Don’t over-blend the chocolate

Since the book was of American origin, I look back and wonder if some of the recipes didn’t turn out as advertised because of the difference between Canadian flour and American flour. Normally I don’t think recipes vary too much across the border, but I would have to agree that in some things, Canadian flour acts differently than American.

A friend of mine who lived in Italy for a time once told me that she visited a specialty grocery store and discovered that Canadian flour was considered to be a specialty item. Apparently Canadian flour is know for its higher gluten content – important when you are making bread since it helps hold everything together and make the dough light and soft. Who knew? In Canada we’re blessed with great flour (unless, of course, you need gluten-free 😉  ).

Chocolate Marble Cookies

Chocolate Marble Cookies

My notation for these cookies was: “Pretty good – if you like sour cream.” I guess I wasn’t much of a fan for the tangy taste the sour cream added back then. I must admit, however, many years later, I think these are very tasty and have a thick and creamy texture that regular cookies don’t usually have.

They also look very pretty and are easy to make. One down side is that they need to be eaten pretty quickly as they will dry out faster than other cookies. They can be frozen to prolong their lifespan, but when you do this the soft, liquid chocolate hardens up and the texture changes slightly.

Another thing to remember is to not over-do these. Don’t over-mix when you add the flour or they become tough, don’t over-mix the chocolate or it won’t have the pretty marble effect and don’t over-bake or they become too hard.

I hope that you are successful making these cookies and that everyone enjoys this “twist” on chocolate chip cookies.

Chocolate Marble Cookies
Yields 20
Chocolate and sour cream turn these drop cookies into a beautiful, tasty treat.
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Ingredients
  1. ½ cup light brown sugar (packed)
  2. ½ cup white sugar
  3. 1 large egg
  4. ½ cup sour cream
  5. 1 tsp vanilla
  6. 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  7. 2 cups flour
  8. 1 tsp baking powder
  9. ¼ tsp salt
Instructions
  1. Combine sugars and butter in a large bowl and beat well.
  2. Add egg, sour cream and vanilla and combine until fluffy.
  3. Combine flour, baking powder and salt in separate bowl.
  4. Slowly mix flour mixture into wet ingredients until just combined. Do not over-mix.
  5. Melt chocolate chips in separate microwave-proof bowl. (Heat 20 seconds at a time, stirring in between.)
  6. Allow chocolate to cool for a few minutes before combining with batter.
  7. Fold chocolate into batter without fully combining. Do not over-mix.
  8. Drop by rounded tablespoons onto pan, leaving 2-3 inches between.
  9. Bake at 350F for 15-18 minutes. Do not brown.
  10. Transfer cookies to a cooling rack after removing from oven. This prevents them from over-baking.
Notes
  1. In this recipe, less is usually more. Less mixing when the flour is added, less stirring when the chocolate is combined, less baking so they don't get too hard and dry.
  2. Store in an air-tight container.
  3. Can be doubled.
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Although I have not personally tried, I imagine that you could substitute all kinds of different chocolate in this recipe for different results. The possibilities are endless – dark chocolate, white chocolate, orange-flavoured chocolate, mint… let me know below if you try anything different – and how it turned out.

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